March for Science, Boston

The Boston branch of the March for Science drew a gratifyingly large and diverse crowd to Boston Common. I decided it was time to get out there and put my feet where my mouth is (not in my mouth; you know what I mean), and I’m glad I did. Here are some pictures to tell the story.

 

 

 

I don’t know who any of these people are, just that they cared enough to come out in support of science, clear thinking, and the welfare of our planet.

Happy Earth Day!

2 Responses

  1. Wally Morris
    | Reply

    The controversy is not about science but the interpretation of science. To say that anyone who disagrees with the majority is “unscientific” strikes me as absurd.

    • Jeffrey A. Carver
      | Reply

      I don’t recall saying that. But when you have an administration that dismisses an overwhelming scientific consensus (about, for example, human-caused climate change) as a hoax–and then tries to overturn hard-won steps intended to mitigate the dangerous things that are happening to the Earth, and for good measure calls for cancellation of further scientific study of changes to the Earth–that’s a lot worse than absurd. That’s playing with fire, and with the world our children will have to live in. You kind of have to follow the money if you want to know why this is happening. I don’t think it’s too extreme to call it criminal.

      And then, to take another example, if you appoint as head of the Environmental Protection Agency someone who has steadfastly opposed environmental protection, it’s not surprising when that person dismisses the recommendations of the EPA’s own scientific staff, and starts overturning rules that protect the environment. Again, that’s not absurd so much as criminal.

      If folks want to disagree with scientific interpretations, that’s their right and duty, but that disagreement should be accompanied by rational and scientific reasoning. So far, I haven’t seen much evidence of that happening. The current administration has only answered science with what I can only call willful ignorance. In defense of corporate profits over the long-term common interests of the population of the planet.

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